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The NSEERS Effect: A Decade of Racial Profiling, Fear, and Secrecy

The NSEERS Effect: A Decade of Racial Profiling, Fear, and Secrecy

Tuesday, May 1, 2012

In the wake of the tragic attacks of September 11, 2001, the landscape of immigration law and policy in the United States changed dramatically as the government scrambled to create counterterrorism programs to respond to potential national security threats. Many of these policies relied on discriminatory profiling of individuals from countries with predominantly Muslim populations and were based on the false assumption that people of a particular religion or nationality have a greater propensity for committing terrorism-related crimes. One of the most prominent of these programs is the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS) or “special registration” that was initiated by the Department of Justice (DOJ) in 2002 and inherited by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2003.

To read the whole report, The NSEERS Effect: A Decade of Racial Profiling, Fear, and Secrecy, click HERE.

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